Book of the Day #7: The Rational Male

IMG_0545A phenomenal book written by ‘Rollo Tomassi’ (pseudonym). This book is mainly targeted at men, but there is something for everyone here to be learned.

The book centre’s around the idea of a positive masculinity achieved by ‘Red Pill awareness’, an idea that will be recognisable by it’s in inception in the film ‘The Matrix’.

Many men have found solace in the work of Rollo Tomassi’s 10 year in the works’ book on intersexual dynamics. For those of you who are struggling with frustrations, relationships, or lack of such; this is not one to be missed…


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day. If you liked this, then check out the last book recommendation!

P.S. The picture features the third edition in the series: ‘The Rational Male: Positive Masculinity’. The firstly is simply ‘The Rational Male’.

 

Book of the Day #6: The Art of War

IMG_0481.jpgA book recommendation list couldn’t go all the way through without giving due reference at least one of the ancient Chinese classics.

Many of you may have heard of the Art of War, and maybe have a vague idea of what it’s about. But for those of you who don’t, here is a little description on it:

Written by Sun Tzu, an ancient Chinese general in the Ming dynasty for his army: this book contains his strategies of war, as informed by the Ancient Taoist philosophy of yin and yang (up and down, left and right ect), and the Law of Mutual arising.

This book is a treatise for those who have an enemy that will not back down. As the book states in the beginning: ‘The best way to win a war is to avoid it at all costs. However, when the enemy will not back down, you must finish it quickly and with the force of 100 boulders.’

The book covers such topics as, battle tactics, encampment, invading enemy territory, espionage, formation and much more.

Although these tactics were inferred for the generals of armies actually going to war, these tactics are surprisingly universal in their law. They touch much of the laws governing our psyche and the universe itself, drawing upon ancient taoist philosophies of balance, mutual arising, and knowledge through no-knowledge.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day. Here’s the last book recommendation 

Book of the Day #5: The Art of Peace

IMG_0479The creator of Aikido ‘Morihei Ueshiba’ brings us the Art of Peace. Translated and published in 1992, this book is a little martial gem. Only 121 short pages long, the philosophies laid out by the master warrior are that from which the martial art of ‘Aikido’ was born.

This book is the perfect counterpart to ‘The art of war’, approaching the same topics but where the art of war approaches the topic from an intent of inflicting wounds, the art of peace comes at it with the intent of overcoming anger with passion.

It is said that Ueshiba was sparring with an opponent in the finals of a sword-fighting tournament when he become disarmed. He proceeded to beat his opponent unarmed and without hurting the man.

Where this book lacks in specific technicalities as to fighting and strategy, it makes up for in soul. Regardless of the mentions of ‘Oneness’ and ‘The way’ that may not appeal to everyone, this book does contain advice that is applicable to martial arts and life universally,

This book presents a more loving way for the warrior to see the world, and how to make one’s impact. Loving does not mean weak.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day! Here is the last book recommendation.

Book of the Day #4: Foundation Training

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An immensely important book by Dr Eric Goodman. Here we are educated on the importance of spinal decompression on all aspects of our health. From our breathing to our digestion to our flipping senses! In short: If you learn how to habitually decompress your spine, you will be more fit, more vital, more alive.

Much has been said about the effects of our dormant lifestyles, much of the day spent in Spinal flexion. The common fitness remedy to this would be to put your back in extension, reversing the ‘C’ curve that our couch potato lives facilitate. This is good, but only a partial solution.

Throughout our lives the spine is under constant compressive forces by gravity, and the body adapts to this in a myriad of ways, many of which cause us muscular imbalance and immense pain over time.
In order to remedy this, Dr Goodman argues, with great and conviction and testimonials, that the right way to fix this is to teach our bodies (through the practices outlined in this book) to press back against gravity. When we teach our spines to move from a lengthened, supported, expansive, anchored, and decompressed state, we create strength, stability, and most importantly space for the joints to move.

The result of this training is that the muscles around the spine that have been shortened, weakened, and often even dormant,  for so long grow longer and stronger. They begin to support the spine in this newly re-discovered decompressed state, allowing the body to press back against gravity while continuing to maintain expansiveness and room for movement.

Warning: you may gain a few inches after practicing the exercises in this book.

I can testify that the results are quite incredible.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day! If you liked this, then check out the last book of the day.

Book of the Day #3: Man’s Search for Meaning

IMG_0483Dr Viktor E. Frankl is somewhat of a hero of mine. A Jewish neurologist born in 1905, Viktor Frankl was rounded up and taken to various concentration camps (including Auschwitz and other) during the Holocaust. Surviving extreme and horrible conditions beyond most people’s comprehension by the skin of his teeth, he went on to write various books and become one of the most prominent and influential psychiatrists of the 20th century. This book is his most well known.

Man’s search for meaning details Dr Frankl’s experiences throughout the war and afterward. He noticed throughout his time in the concentration camps that there seemed to be a pattern in regards to who would die and who would live. Seeing it time and time again, he realised that there was also a pattern to people’s stages of psychological deterioration. Dr Frankl went on to devise his own psychological method for treating mental health issues. He called it ‘Logotherapy’.

Google: ‘Logos, (Greek: “word,” “reason,” or “plan”) plural logoi, in Greek philosophy and theology, the divine reason implicit in the cosmos, ordering it and giving it form and meaning.’

A book that puts our world into perspective; which shows the human condition survive and learn under the worst conditions imaginable.
Fascinatingly Dr Frankl speaks of his captors not in terms of evil, but in terms of reason. He tries to understand them. This is a book to be read and re-read.

At the end of the book Dr Frankl includes an outline as to the application of Logotherapy as a psychological method. Many people will gain actionable information in this part of the book. His method shows much parallel with eastern religions, but with a western twist.

Can’t recommend this book enough.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day! Here is the last book recommendation.

Book of the day #2: Stuffocation

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From the mind of James Wallman: A strangely endearing book filled with anecdotes covering cultural materialism, the different social reactions against it, and the true solution to our obsession with things: The ‘Experience Revolution’.

Many of us are accumulators not of experience, but of things. This book touches on the way that we as a culture in the west, tend to lean towards this tendency in order to keep up with the Jones’s. Our intuitive disgust as to this state of affairs includes: ultra-hording, minimalism, isolationism, middle-wayism (okay I’m making this up now but you get the point) in order to beat the Jones’s in a game of underground social warfare, ie: We’re more humble than you are.

Wallman explains how we got to this point via the ethos of the industrial revolution post world wars. He proposes a convincing and eloquently stated argument as to how, through social advertising and formal education, we have been conditioned to horde things and work in factories (to create more things). These things have become the currency by which we regard our personal and social value in relation to others.
It turns out that this setup is economically profitable for people in power… ?!

There are also a few Economic lessons in this book including the ’S’ curve that are very interesting to read. I’d recommend the chapter explaining ‘How we got here.’

One need not read it cover to cover, although I did, a single anecdote from each chapter would suffice. This book is important because it shows us ourselves from a perspective that we have felt ill of intuitively, but may not have considered to it’s full extent.

In this day and age of things, this is an important book to have on your shelf and a valuable gift to others.
Since I read this book in 2014, it has been an undercurrent in my shifting world view that has been a true blessing and a truly positive influence on my life, which is truly all that I could ask for from a book of this kind.


-Ben

Watched out for the next book of the day! Here’s the last book recommendation.