Book of the day #10: Still The Mind

IMG_0634Constant thoughts, constant distractions; wired on adrenaline. Some of us are driven to madness by the constant dopamine rush, the need for more. Alan Watts brings us a remedy to that via trains of thought like no other.

A man gifted with his words, the likes of which the world has never seen before: Alan brings us a refreshing perspective on the nature of life, the universe, and everything in his own signature humorous manner..

A small book, it could easily be read in a day. However Alan’s words will undoubtedly take you to places that you have never been before. Revelation after revelation will take time to digest, and there is no better man to take on that journey than Mr Watts himself.


-Ben

If you liked this post then check out the last book recommendation.

 

Book of the day #9: This is a Voice

IMG_0614We all have a voice. We use it every day to communicate ourselves, to get things done, to leave our mark upon the world. Because it is just that: uniquely ours. Every single voice is the unique expression of that individual soul, and because of that it is very personal to us.

So… Why not learn how to use it properly?

This book details, through 99 separate exercises, how to effectively understand and utilise your voice’s capacity for full expression, in a variety of contexts. Whether you’re a singer, an actor, a corporate exec, or just someone looking to sound more powerful, this book has got you covered.

In a day an age where we use our voices almost excessively throughout the day, it has never been more beneficial to learn how to use it effectively.


-Ben

Watch out for the last book of the day! If you liked this, check out the last book recommendation.

Book of the Day #8: The Richest Man in Babylon

IMG_0484.jpgWritten by George Samuel Clason. Based in the Persian city of Babylon: This book tells entertaining parables full of ancient knowledge as to the psychological secrets of accumulating and managing wealth; and it’s wisdom spreads to far more than just economic and material wealth.

In equal parts entertaining and informative, this book is recommended by multiple contemporary economic giants such as Warren Buffet and Forbes Magazine.

In it’s simplicity lies complexity, for it lays out through it’s  stories the underlying principles behind the secrets of wealth vs poverty. One can also take a philosophy as to how to manage oneself.

An entry from wikipedia exponents: ‘George S. Clason here gives a historical overview of Babylon, noting that although “its very name conjures visions of wealth and splendor” that the city itself was located next to the EuphratesRiver “in a flat, arid valley. It had no forests, no mines–not even stone for building. It was not even located upon a natural trade-route. The rainfall was insufficient to raise crops. Babylon is an outstanding example of man’s ability to achieve great objectives, using whatever means are at his disposal. All of the resources supporting this large city were man-developed. All of its riches were man-made.” ‘

A small, but indispensable classic. Definitely worth a read for anyone interested in the principles behind wealth in all of it’s forms.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day. If you this post, then check out the last book recommendation. Much love.

Book of the Day #6: The Art of War

IMG_0481.jpgA book recommendation list couldn’t go all the way through without giving due reference at least one of the ancient Chinese classics.

Many of you may have heard of the Art of War, and maybe have a vague idea of what it’s about. But for those of you who don’t, here is a little description on it:

Written by Sun Tzu, an ancient Chinese general in the Ming dynasty for his army: this book contains his strategies of war, as informed by the Ancient Taoist philosophy of yin and yang (up and down, left and right ect), and the Law of Mutual arising.

This book is a treatise for those who have an enemy that will not back down. As the book states in the beginning: ‘The best way to win a war is to avoid it at all costs. However, when the enemy will not back down, you must finish it quickly and with the force of 100 boulders.’

The book covers such topics as, battle tactics, encampment, invading enemy territory, espionage, formation and much more.

Although these tactics were inferred for the generals of armies actually going to war, these tactics are surprisingly universal in their law. They touch much of the laws governing our psyche and the universe itself, drawing upon ancient taoist philosophies of balance, mutual arising, and knowledge through no-knowledge.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day. Here’s the last book recommendation 

Book of the Day #5: The Art of Peace

IMG_0479The creator of Aikido ‘Morihei Ueshiba’ brings us the Art of Peace. Translated and published in 1992, this book is a little martial gem. Only 121 short pages long, the philosophies laid out by the master warrior are that from which the martial art of ‘Aikido’ was born.

This book is the perfect counterpart to ‘The art of war’, approaching the same topics but where the art of war approaches the topic from an intent of inflicting wounds, the art of peace comes at it with the intent of overcoming anger with passion.

It is said that Ueshiba was sparring with an opponent in the finals of a sword-fighting tournament when he become disarmed. He proceeded to beat his opponent unarmed and without hurting the man.

Where this book lacks in specific technicalities as to fighting and strategy, it makes up for in soul. Regardless of the mentions of ‘Oneness’ and ‘The way’ that may not appeal to everyone, this book does contain advice that is applicable to martial arts and life universally,

This book presents a more loving way for the warrior to see the world, and how to make one’s impact. Loving does not mean weak.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day! Here is the last book recommendation.

Book of the Day #4: Foundation Training

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An immensely important book by Dr Eric Goodman. Here we are educated on the importance of spinal decompression on all aspects of our health. From our breathing to our digestion to our flipping senses! In short: If you learn how to habitually decompress your spine, you will be more fit, more vital, more alive.

Much has been said about the effects of our dormant lifestyles, much of the day spent in Spinal flexion. The common fitness remedy to this would be to put your back in extension, reversing the ‘C’ curve that our couch potato lives facilitate. This is good, but only a partial solution.

Throughout our lives the spine is under constant compressive forces by gravity, and the body adapts to this in a myriad of ways, many of which cause us muscular imbalance and immense pain over time.
In order to remedy this, Dr Goodman argues, with great and conviction and testimonials, that the right way to fix this is to teach our bodies (through the practices outlined in this book) to press back against gravity. When we teach our spines to move from a lengthened, supported, expansive, anchored, and decompressed state, we create strength, stability, and most importantly space for the joints to move.

The result of this training is that the muscles around the spine that have been shortened, weakened, and often even dormant,  for so long grow longer and stronger. They begin to support the spine in this newly re-discovered decompressed state, allowing the body to press back against gravity while continuing to maintain expansiveness and room for movement.

Warning: you may gain a few inches after practicing the exercises in this book.

I can testify that the results are quite incredible.


-Ben

Watch out for the next book of the day! If you liked this, then check out the last book of the day.